Categories: News, Nutrition.

Written by James Morris Personal Trainer

 

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New sugar tax to combat obesity

 

Sugar-filled soft drinks will see a tax hike in April 2018 in an attempt to combat rising levels of obesity.

Tax on drinks with more than five grams of sugar per 100ml will be levied by 18p per litre, while those with eight grams or more of sugar per 100ml will have an extra tax of 24p per litre.However, he added that revenues could be lower than expected as companies reduce the amount of sugar in their products to avoid the tax.

This could bring significant health benefits, cutting rates of tooth decay, obesity and type 2 diabetes, although soft drinks manufacturers say there is no evidence this will be the case.

Book in a complimentary personal training appointment with James today for help achieving your health and body composition goals.

 

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Last Updated: 9th March 2017. Intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral.

 

References:

The Independent. 2017. Budget 2017: New sugar tax confirmed by Philip Hammond in fight to combat rising obesity | The Independent. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/budget-2017-sugar-tax-philip-hammond-fight-obesity-child-weight-gain-fizzy-drinks-a7618316.html. [Accessed 09 March 2017].

Categories: Lifestyle.

Written by James Morris Personal Trainer

 

free health and fitness newsletter

 

40 days and 40 nights

 

Are you giving up certain foods or activities during Lent (a 40-day period between Ash Wednesday and Easter) or are your adding positive foods or activities to your life?

 

Whatever you choose, traditional lent is talked about lasting for 40 days. So you need strategies and S.M.A.R.T goals in places to achieve them.

 

Your goals should be achievable and have short term accomplishments, that achieve your long term goal. You should have rewards in place for achieving your short term goals that do not adversely affect your long term goals. This could be a new DVD or dress.

 

Whatever you choose to do, make sure it positively affect your life, and if you have any will power left over, see if you can last another 26 more days as science has shown that habits are form, after you consistently repeat a task for a 66 day period.

 

Book in a complimentary personal training appointment with James today for help achieving your health and body composition goals.

 

Free consultation

 

Last Updated: 27th February 2017. Intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral.

Categories: Lifestyle.

Written by James Morris Personal Trainer

 

Autopilot causes weight gain?

 

The consequence of automatic responses to contextual food cues are an increased caloric consumption and poor dietary choices.  Contextual food cues are a specific circumstance or situation that solicits a particular response. For example, if on the way home from work you drive past a supermarket, it may trigger you to buy a bar of chocolate.

 

To create a new behaviour that changes the automatic response to contextual cues, you have to acknowledge and avoid the situation or circumstance that triggers the particular eating or drinking response.

Lets use the supermarket example; if driving past the supermarket triggers you to buy a chocolate bar, then to remedy this response, you would simple change the route in which you a driving to get to your given destination.

This would reduce calorie consumption and reduce poor dietary choices which would help you lose body weight.

 

References:

 

Deborah A. Cohen, MD, MPH and Susan H. Babey, PhD. 2012. Contextual Influences on Eating Behaviors: Heuristic Processing and Dietary Choices. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3667220/. [Accessed 1 February 2017].

 

Last Updated: 1st February 2017. Intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral.

Categories: Lifestyle, Nutrition.

Written by James Morris Personal Trainer

 

Spend less while eating healthy

 

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) rose by 1.6% in the year to December 2016, compared with a 1.2% rise in the year to November. (sager. 2017) The main contributor to this, was the increase in the price of food.

 

Ten money saving tips: (BDA. 2016.)

  1. Plan ahead, write a shopping list and avoid impulse purchases.
  2. Cut food waste by eating leftovers from your evening meal for lunch or freezing for the following week.
  3. Look out for weekly fruit and vegetable deals at superstores, markets and local shops.
  4. Cut your meat – swap for pulses (beans, lentils and peas) and vegetables for example when making spaghetti Bolognese, replace the mince with tinned chickpeas, lentils or kidneys beans and add frozen vegetables.
  5. Use leftover vegetables from your evening meal to make soup for lunch the next day – simply pop in a pan with a stock-cube, cover with water and cook on a low heat for 10 minutes, then blend or eat it chunky with some wholemeal or seeded bread.
  6. Try superstore value brands, which often taste just as good for a lower price.
  7. Try tinned or frozen fruit and vegetables – buy fruit in natural juices/water instead of in syrup when you can, to avoid extra calories from the added sugar.
  8. Rely less upon ‘ready’ or manufactured food like takeaways or processed meats and cook from scratch. Look at the resource list (turn over) for where to nd easy, healthy low-cost recipes.
  9. Ask members of staff at local supermarkets for fresh food reduction times to grab a bargain. Use within date or freeze for later.
  10. Buy some dried herbs and spices, for example chilli powder, paprika and mixed Italian herbs – they are not expensive and they add great avour to simple homemade dishes.

Making the simple changes will help you to save money, eat well and contribute towards a balanced diet and lifestyle.

 

Book in a complimentary personal training appointment with James today at www.jamesmorrispt.co.uk for help achieving your health and body composition goals.

 

References:

sager. 2017. UK consumer price inflation – Office for National Statistics. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/inflationandpriceindices/bulletins/consumerpriceinflation/dec2016. [Accessed 31 January 2017].

The British Dietetic Association (BDA). 2016. Eat well, spend less. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/PackedLunches.pdf. [Accessed 31 January 2017].

 

Last Updated: 31th January 2017. Intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral.

Categories: Nutrition.

Written by James Morris Personal Trainer

 

Healthy Packed Lunches

 

Packed lunches don’t have to be bland, you just have to plan and prepare to create a healthy and tasty meal that will support your health, fitness and weight loss goals.

 

When planning include the following food groups to include:

  • Starchy carbohydrates, are packed full of nutrients (including B vitamins, iron and fibre) Try some couscous, wholemeal bread, rice or potatoes and mix it with cut-up vegetables
  • Fruit and vegetables, try to eat five (or more) portions of fruit and vegetables every day to prevent heart disease and reduce the risk of some types of cancer. Some good ideas for lunch are salad vegetables (cucumber, tomato or avocado), chopped raw vegetables (carrot sticks and cherry tomatoes), apple, grapes and banana.
  • Protein containing foods (meat, fish, eggs and beans), and is needed for the growth and repair of your body.
  • And milk and dairy foods – calcium is important to keep your teeth healthy and your bones strong. You can include, plain yogurt, cheese, and a glass of milk.
  • Take a drink, current recommendations for women is to drink 1.6 litres and men 2 litres of water (or other fluids) per day

There are lots of foods that can be used to make a packed lunch varied and tasty. Just remember to include something from each of the four main food groups, as well as a drink, and you’ll not only have a meal to look forward to but a lunchbox packed full of all the right nutrients to fuel your body for the rest of the day.(BDA. 2016.)

 

Book in a complimentary personal training appointment with James today at www.jamesmorrispt.co.uk for help achieving your health and body composition goals.

 

References:

 

The British Dietetic Association (BDA). 2016. Healthy Packed Lunches. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/PackedLunches.pdf. [Accessed 30 January 2017].

 

Last Updated: 30th January 2017. Intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral.